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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
to exist, right? our strategy in the old days was to align ourselves with a big media company -- cbs. we align ourselves with yahoo! in some way and with ail -- aol in another way. you need the types of connections with more established or at least larger players in order to survive. the other reason is that the proliferation of sites has caused a change in the way people get their news. no longer do they just go to what we call destination sites, which was essentially a newspaper online. they are getting their news on facebook and google and bing and search engines. to be out there in that news sphere, you have to have different ways of attacking a and having connections and distribution arrangements. >> i would like to add that proliferation of new sites creates more demand for content, which creates more opportunity for professional writers. before you think about going into news as a business as an independent publisher, you have to think about what the need is, if there is a need in that particular space for another site, and then how you distinguish yourself and the content you pro
-- dare i say -- not threatened, but some kind of competition has come in from the big boys? you were having a nice conversation earlier. i listen in. do you see yahoo! going local, for example, as a plus, or do you see them as competition? how did you see that? >> first, full disclosure, yahoo! is a content partner for oakland local. they distribute our content on their website. there is some back and forth. some people are wondering what the corporate industries are going to do in a hyperlocal space. i do think there is space for everyone to work together. one of the questions i'm interested in hearing about is whether the corporate entities are interested in working with local entities. we have been working with oakland for the last year-and-a- half, and i have a background in oakland activism, and it has still been difficult for us to get headway as an organization. that kind of community involvement takes a 24/7 kind of commitment. that is slightly different than the commitment it takes to run a yahoo! new site. i'm interested in with the challenges will be, but i'm much more int
, "this is what we told you it was. this is from here. and this is where it comes from." and that's a big deal. information is a big deal. >> the restaurant has an extremely busy kitchen. but to mills, who's in his sixties, it's like home from home. he knows about the stresses chefs face, since he used to be one. for 14 years, he was the head chef for randy parary restaurants in sacramento. today, he's traded in his chef's hat to promote, educate, and even celebrate produce with other chefs. >> i use email. i use the phone. but the best thing to do is to be able to go into a restaurant, to go into the kitchen, to find the person cooking the food, and say, "hey, what can i get you? what are you looking for?" >> i would just be doing seed production if it weren't for jim driving in here and refusing to drive away and sayin "no, i really want this stuff. no, you don't understand, i really do want to buy this stuff." and "i really want this, and i really want it now, and i really want some, and i wnt samples," and you know, so forth and so on despite my best efforts to get rid of him. >> as c
was removed and a new wall was built. the lot where 22 once sat is still there. there are big disputes over whether it can be developed safely predict -- developed safely. and the filbert street stairs, because of the rockfall that occurred, new stairs were built, and they were built in a manner that when rockfalls occur, that actually lift out the stairs and put them on the ground and allow the crane to get back there to access the rockfall. >> beyond that, the building that we see at the bottom of the rockfall was actually designed to allow barack to fall off and be compounded by the building -- actually designed to allow barack to fall off and be impounded by the building. >> that is the corner of sansome and green. every couple years, there is a rock fall that occurs behind that building. >> now we are on russian hill. this is the most beautiful location of exposed bedrock. across the street from the art institute on chestnut. >> that and tires sitting -- that entire setting, that is a beautiful setting, the deck and the panorama of the city. >> cannot be it. now we are on at leavenwort
. they had a big blob of concrete that went from the wall, the rod, and then the block of concrete. if the wall tried to move, it would engage the rod, which would engage the block of concrete. these were built as gravity walls. they're very, very wide at the base. gosh, some of them are six, eight, 10 feet wide, and they are like dams. they are faced with basalt blocks that came from the quarries in marin county. they have performed very well. the classic gravity wall. there is enough friction along the base, and there is a slope on the backside, so there is enough weight pushing down on the wall that keeps it from moving. >> this is on broadway, along rage and russian hill. >> that is a completely different design. this is truly what is called a cantilever retaining wall. it is designed to rotate and move. you can see the quality of construction. probably what they did in those days, they would take the rock that was present in the vicinity and mix it with the cement and create concrete. so there is no quality control. the strength of that wall various props -- varies from batch
any intron decisions on this budget. that we had a big challenge to not only create a foundation for years to come, but that we would make sure that we had a budget that would reflect long-term investments and the long-term financial health of this city. we set out a course to collaborate with as many people as possible and to make sure that our budget was reflective of what san francisco knows how to do. that is collaborate and build consensus. we held over 10 budget town hall meetings. we've met over hundreds of residents, community organizations. we met with city commissioners, labor organizations, business owners, and activists, and throughout all those meetings, they are able to shift some $28 million in changes to the budget. this budget not only reflects our values, it is about the future of our city. you have heard all of those that you have attended. the budget town hall meetings and meetings with our community- based agencies. you need not hear from me today again about the goal, but i do want you to hear from people who i think are our challenge and reflective of our c
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)